GRACE :: Blood Cancers
Denise Brock

Blood Cancers Video Library: What is the role of MRD in MM

Share
download as a pdf file Download PDF of this page

GRACE CVL Logo 1400x1400 v03c ffb266 Blood

GRACE joined a number of top faculty in the area of hematology in Whistler BC, for the 3rd Annual Summit on Hematologic Malignancies.  Sagar Lonial, MD, FACP, Professor and Chair, Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Chief Medical Officer, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, speaks with GRACE about what is the role of MRD, or Minimal Residual Disease assessment, in the context of multiple myeloma.

 

We invite you to watch this and other videos from our Blood Cancers Library Video collection

Stay tuned for more educational videos!

 


 

Please feel free to offer comments and raise questions in our Discussion Forums.


TRANSCRIPT 

Download Transcript

What is the role of MRD in MM?

Sagar Lonial, MD, FACP

Professor and Chair, Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine,

Chief Medical Officer, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

 

Another question that often comes up is: what is the role of MRD, or Minimal Residual Disease assessment, in the context of multiple myeloma? And I think what we’ve learned in the last few years is that, even when you don’t use MRD, you use something as simple as complete remission by free light chain or immunofixation studies, that association of a deeper response almost always correlates with better outcomes.

We now have two different methods to assess MRD. One is called flow cytometry and the other one uses what we call next generation sequencing. What we know is that at least from current data it appears that next generation sequencing does offer a better predictive value in terms of outcomes for patients with either MRD negative or MRD positive disease. What we don’t know is for patients who are MRD positive, meaning they do have residual disease, as measured by whether it’s sequencing or flow cytometry, whether treating them differently changes their outcome.

I think at this point the use of MRD is really limited to clinical trials. We don’t have any data that says, for a standard risk or high risk patient who is MRD positive, that changing their therapy impacts their outcome. Until we have that data from large trials, it’s going to be hard to act on MRD data unless you see florid relapse evolving in a very rapid manner. At this point in 2016, I don’t know that MRD assessment is ready for what we call prime time, but I think it’s getting there, and I think in the context of clinical trials it may offer significant information for us in the future.

 

 


 

 

 


Comments are closed.

Ask Us, Q&A
Blood Cancers Expert Content

Archives

Archives

Share
download as a pdf file Download PDF of this page

GRACE Cancer Video Library - Lung Cancer Videos

 

2015_Immunotherapy_Forum_Videos

 

2015 Acquired Resistance in Lung Cancer Patient Forum Videos

Share
download as a pdf file Download PDF of this page

Join the GRACE Faculty

Lung/Thoracic Cancer Blog
Breast Cancer Blog
Pancreatic Cancer Blog
Kidney Cancer Blog
Bladder Cancer Blog
Head/Neck Cancer Blog
Blood Cancers Blog
Share
download as a pdf file Download PDF of this page

Subscribe to the GRACEcast Podcast on iTunes

Share
download as a pdf file Download PDF of this page

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon

Subscribe to
GRACE Notes
   (Free Newsletter)

Recent Comments

    Other Resources

    Share
    download as a pdf file Download PDF of this page

    ClinicalTrials.gov


    Biomedical Learning Institute

    peerview_institute_logo_243