GRACE :: Lung Cancer

BRAF

Denise Brock

Lung Cancer Video Library – BRAF V600E As A Target In Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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GRACE Cancer Video Library - Lung

 

Dr. Stephen Liu

 

We are pleased to have Dr. Stephen Liu  bring us further updates for our 2017 Lung Cancer Video Library.  

Dr. Liu, a board-certified medical oncologist, specializes in lung cancer, cancers of the head and neck, and skin. Dr. Liu is a strong advocate of genomic testing to identify actionable mutations leading to the most effective, targeted therapies for personalized care. He is the recipient of many teaching and patient care awards. 

In this latest video, Dr. Liu discusses BRAF V600E As A Target In Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer


 

 

 

 

 

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 We would like to thank the following companies for their support of this program

 

                

 

 

                        

 

 
 

 

 


  


Denise Brock

Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer Patient Forum 2017 – Presentations and Handouts

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Videos from the webcast Targeted Therapies Patient Forum 2017 are available for viewing, and for those who prefer to read the material, GRACE has made all speaker presentations and handouts available.  We have also included links to helpful social media and patient groups.  

Again, huge thanks to all of the faculty who spent their Saturday in Cleveland with our community, and thanks also to those organizations who sponsored this event – Astra Zeneca, Takeda, Boehringer Ingelheim, Ignyta, Novartis, Genentech, Caris, and Guardant Health.  

We started the day out with a warm welcome from our Forum Chair – Dr. Nathan Pennell.  For the full agenda, faculty list, presentations, and videos from the webcast, please visit the ‘webcast details’ page, available via this link.  For those who would like to view the presentations from the Targeted Therapies Patient Forum in Cleveland, please view and download all presentations and handouts here, or continue on for a list of what is available.   

The morning sessions kicked off with a warm welcome from Dr. Pennell.  

General Session
 
The Many Faces of Progression
Dr. Nathan Pennell, Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center  
Pennell – The Many Faces of Progression
 
The Role of Local Therapy
Dr. Shirish Gadgeel, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan  
Gadgeel – Local Therapy  
 
Biopsies & Re-biopsies
Dr. Karen Reckamp, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center 
Reckamp – Biopsy and Re-biopsy
 
The Question of Clinical Trials
Dr. Alice Shaw, Massachusetts General Hospital
Shaw – Question of Clinical Trials
 
The Crossroads:
Local Therapy, Chemo, Targeted  Therapy, or Immunotherapy?
Panel Discussion with Drs. Pennell,  Gadgeel, Reckamp, and Shaw, and patients John Cherol (EGFR), Matt  Hiznay (ALK), and Sara Whitlock (RET), Moderator: Dr. H. (Jack) West
 
After lunch the breakout discussions continued: 
 
ALK/ROS1
Dr. Alice Shaw, Dr. Shirish Gadgeel, and Matt Hiznay, ALK patient
Shaw ALK/ROS1 Breakout  
Gadgeel – ALK Breakout
Hiznay ALK Breakout 
ROS1ders Information
 
ALK-positive NSCLC: ALK Positive
“ALK Positive” on Facebook (closed group): https://www.facebook.com/groups/ALKPositive/ 
“ALK Positive Outreach” on Facebook (public group): https://www.facebook.com/groups/ALKPositiveOR/
 
ROS1-positive cancer (any cancer):  The ROS1ders
“ROS1 Positive (ROS1+) Cancer” on Facebook (private group):  https://www.facebook.com/groups/ROS1cancer/
“ROS1 Cancer Research Forum” on Facebook (public community): https://www.facebook.com/ROS1CancerResearchForum/
“The ROS1ders” website: http://ros1cancer.com
ROS1ders Information
 
EGFR
Dr. Nathan Pennell, Dr. H. (Jack) West, and John Cherol, EGFR patient
West – EGFR Acquired Resistance  
Pennell – EGFR Initial Treatment
 
EGFR-positive NSCLC
“LUNGevity EGFR Group” on Facebook (closed group): https://www.facebook.com/groups/EGFRlung/
EGFR-positive patients who have developed resistance to at least one TKI
EGFR Resisters Lung Cancer Patient Group” on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1992981107603006/
EGFR-positive Exon 20 insertion cancer (any cancer)
“Exon20 Group” website http://www.exon20group.org/
 
MET/RET/BRAF
Dr. Karen Reckamp, Dr. Vamsidhar  Velcheti, and Sara Whitlock, RET patient 
Reckamp – MET-RET-BRAF breakout
Velceti – MET RET Breakout
 
RET-positive NSCLC
“LUNGevity RET Group” on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1230457690298084/
 
The day concluded with the afternoon general session: 
 
General Session
 
Managing the Cost of Cancer Care
Dr. James P. Stevenson, Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center
Stevenson -Managing the Cost of Cancer Care
 
Patient to Patient Mentoring
Kathryn Sefcek, MHA, 4th Angel Mentoring Program  
4th Angel Mentoring Program Information
4th Angel Mentoring Program
 
Caveat Emptor: Assessing Cancer Information from Sources of  Varying Quality  
Dr. H. (Jack) West, Swedish Cancer Institute & Founder of  cancerGRACE, and Janet Freeman-Daily, ROS1 patient,  #LCSM Twitter Chat co- moderator, Cure  Today contributor, blogger.
West – Caveat Emptor: Assessing Cancer Information from Sources of Varying Quality
Find Trusted Online Info About Lung Cancer 

Please feel free to offer comments and raise questions in our Discussion Forums.


GRACE would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of this program

 


Denise Brock

Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer Patient Forum 2017 – It’s a Wrap!

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On Saturday, September 16, 2017, patients, caregivers, family members and friends joined GRACE in Cleveland at the Taussig Cancer Center for a full day of discussion on Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer.  We are thrilled that people joined us for this amazing and informative day.  Huge thanks to all of the faculty who spent their Saturday in Cleveland with our community, and thanks also to those organizations who sponsored this event – Astra Zeneca, Takeda, Boehringer Ingelheim, Ignyta, Novartis, Genentech, Caris, and Guardant Health.  

 

We started the day out with a warm welcome from our Forum Chair – Dr. Nathan Pennell.  For the full agenda, faculty list, presentations, and videos from the webcast, please visit the ‘webcast details’ page, available via this link.     

  Brain Power

The morning sessions continued:

The Many Faces of Progression
 Dr. Nathan Pennell
 Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center
The Role of Local Therapy
 Dr. Shirish Gadgeel
 Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan
 Biopsies & Re-biopsies
 Dr. Karen Reckamp
 City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center 
The Question of Clinical Trials
 Dr. Alice Shaw
 Massachusetts General Hospital
 The Crossroads:
 Local Therapy, Chemo, Targeted  Therapy, or Immunotherapy?
 Panel Discussion with Drs. Pennell,  Gadgeel, Reckamp, and Shaw,
 and patients John Cherol (EGFR), Matt  Hiznay (ALK),
 and Sara Whitlock (RET).
 Moderator: Dr. H. (Jack) West 
 
 
 
Lunch was an opportunity to have further discussion with the faculty.  Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center graciously allowed us to set up lunch on the 1st floor in their beautiful new facility.

 
 
 
 
After lunch the breakout discussions continued: 
 
ALK/ROS1
 Dr. Alice Shaw, Dr. Shirish Gadgeel,
 and Matt Hiznay, ALK patient
 EGFR
 Dr. Nathan Pennell, Dr. H. (Jack) West,
 and John Cherol, EGFR patient
 MET/RET/BRAF
 Dr. Karen Reckamp, Dr. Vamsidhar  Velcheti, and Sara Whitlock, RET patient 
 
The day concluded with the afternoon general session: 
Managing the Cost of Cancer Care
 Dr. James P. Stevenson
 Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center
 Patient to Patient Mentoring
 Kathryn Sefcek, MHA
 4th Angel Mentoring Program
 Caveat Emptor: Assessing Cancer Information from Sources of  Varying Quality  
 Dr. H. (Jack) West
 Swedish Cancer Institute & Founder of  cancerGRACE
 and Janet Freeman-Daily, ROS1 patient,  #LCSM Twitter Chat co- moderator, Cure  Today contributor, blogger
 

Please click here to visit the Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer Webcast page for viewing the videos in full!  (Please note, we will be editing the videos to cut them down – they are in raw format at this time).

 

 

Please feel free to offer comments and raise questions in our Discussion Forums.


GRACE would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of this program

 


GRACE Video

Multiplex Testing for Rare Mutations: What Are the Potential Benefits?

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GRACE Cancer Video Library - Lung

GCVL_LU-B09_Multiplex_Testing_Rare_Mutations_Potential_Benefits

 

Dr. Ross Camidge, University of Colorado, discusses the potential benefits as well as the disadvantages of multiplex mutation testing.

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Transcript

More and more, when people are doing molecular testing on their tumor, they’re not just getting one test and if it’s negative doing another test — that’s called sequential testing, they’re doing lots of tests at the same time — that’s called multiplex testing. There are certain good things about that and certain things which are less than good.

In terms of good things, if you do a whole bunch of tests at the same time, you don’t have as long a delay. If you test sequentially it may take you a while before you get to the positive and if you want to make a decision on your treatment as soon as possible, it’s good to get all the information upfront. Also because when you do the sequential testing, each individual way of preparing the tissue wastes some; multiplex testing is a more efficient use of the tissue, so it reduces the chance that you’re going to need another repeat biopsy.

There’s a certain health economic advantage when you utilize multiplex testing, it is what’s called a noncumulative increase in cost. So to look for ten mutations doesn’t cost as much as ten times looking for one mutation. Maybe it costs two or three times as much, and you can add on extra tests.

Perhaps one of the reasons why we’re most enthused by this idea of multiplex testing is you’re going to find some of these rarer abnormalities. Not just the ALK and the EGFR, but increasingly, there’s a collection of abnormalities which are actionable, sometimes through licensed drugs which are not yet licensed in lung cancer but licensed in other diseases, sometimes because they’re an entry into a specific clinical trial. Examples that spring to mind in lung cancer include RET rearrangements, ROS1 rearrangements, and BRAF mutations.

I said there were a few things which were not good. Perhaps the biggest thing is there are some companies commercially doing this who perhaps are adding too many unnecessary tests, and by that I mean tests that really haven’t got any proven value and they’re using up your tissue, they’re increasing the expense to your insurance firm. Perhaps the other downside is that sometimes you get such a wealth of data, like a data dump, you don’t quite know which one to take to the bank. You get all of this information, there are multiple different mutations, and many of them are not driving the cancer, they’re what are sometimes called passenger mutations, and sometimes that ability to sift through it is pushed back onto you or your doctor. Sometimes there’s an algorithm that will print out, “oh, you’re eligible for this trial, or that trial” and there the issue is, what is their metric for saying there’s good enough data to say, “yes, you should go travel to go on this clinical trial.” Sometimes they have a pretty low bar to get over.

For me the best thing to do is — yes, multiplex testing is a good idea, there are certain companies which are better at this than others, and when you get that information you can’t just assume that everything in it is a meaningful result and you really have to sit down, hopefully with an oncologist who understands this, to go through it.


GRACE Video

What is the Value of Testing for Molecular Markers in Advanced NSCLC?

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GRACE Cancer Video Library - Lung

GCVL_LU_Testing_Value_Molecular_Markers_Advanced_NSCLC

 

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center medical oncologist Dr. Greg Riely explains how testing for specific mutations in patients with advanced NSCLC can guide prognosis and treatment recommendations.

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Transcript

When we’re evaluating a patient with lung cancer, the first question we start to ask is, what’s going on with this patient’s cancer? Where is the disease, so has it spread to other sites, and what does it look like under the microscope? So, what’s the tumor histology, is it an adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma. And then, importantly, molecular testing has become a critical part of our understanding of a patient with lung cancer.

Now, by doing molecular testing, we’re able to better refine the prognostic and predictive value of a variety of drugs and treatments that we have going forward, for designing an overall treatment plan for a patient. Some of the most common testing that should be done are EGFR and ALK — now, these are important because these both have FDA approved drugs that are indicated for abnormalities in EGFR and ALK. If you go beyond those two things, there are actually a long list of drugs that can target individual molecular aberrations and molecular abnormalities, but they’re uncommon, and we don’t have FDA approved drugs for those things, but I think if we go beyond those EGFR and ALK tests, we can learn a lot more and sometimes help patients a great deal.


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