GRACE :: Lung Cancer

Immunotherapy

Denise Brock

Join Us! 2017 Advances in Immunotherapy: What Lung Cancer Patients Need to Know

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The Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education (GRACE)
in partnership with Georgetown University Hospital
is pleased to present

2017 Advances in Immunotherapy: What Lung Cancer Patients Need to Know

Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017 | 1 – 3:30 pm; Leavey Center at Georgetown Hospital 
3800 Reservoir Road, NW, WASHINGTON, DC
 
View the Agenda
Register to Attend the Forum Live or via the Live Webcast
Suggested donation $15

 

 

 

How does immunotherapy work? Presented by Alex Spira, M.D., Ph.D., F.A.C.P. Virginia Cancer Specialists


 

 

Who should get immunotherapy for lung cancer? Presented by Benjamin Levy, MD Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Sibley Memorial Hospital


 

 

What are the side effects? Presented by Stephen Liu, MD Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University Hospital


 

 

 

Navigating clinical trials? Panel discussion


 

Please feel free to offer comments and raise questions in our Discussion Forums.


GRACE would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of this program

 


Denise Brock

ASCO 2017 – Lung Cancer – What is the role for Immunotherapy in Relapsed Small Cell Lung Cancer after ASCO 2017?

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H. Jack West, MD
Medical Director
Thoracic Oncology Program Swedish Cancer Institute
President & CEO, GRACE
Matthew Gubens, MD
Thoracic Oncologist
Thoracic Surgery and Oncology Clinic
UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
Jyoti D. Patel, MD
Director Thoracic Oncology
University of Chicago Medicine

 

Drs. H. Jack West, Medical Director of the Thoracic Oncology Program at Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle, Washington and President and CEO of GRACE, Matthew Gubens, Thoracic Oncologist at the Thoracic Surgery and Oncology Clinic of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Center in San Francisco, California, and Jyoti Patel, Director of Thoracic Oncology at University of Chicago Medicine gathered post meeting to discuss new information from ASCO 2017 regarding lung cancer.   In this roundtable video, the doctors discuss What is the role for Immunotherapy in Relapsed Small Cell Lung Cancer after ASCO 2017?



 

 Please feel free to offer comments and raise questions in our Discussion Forums.


GRACE would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of this program

  
   
                   

 


Denise Brock

ASCO 2017 – Lung Cancer – Continuing Immunotherapy Beyond Progression

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H. Jack West, MD
Medical Director
Thoracic Oncology Program Swedish Cancer Institute
President & CEO, GRACE
Matthew Gubens, MD
Thoracic Oncologist
Thoracic Surgery and Oncology Clinic
UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
Jyoti D. Patel, MD
Director Thoracic Oncology
University of Chicago Medicine

 

Drs. H. Jack West, Medical Director of the Thoracic Oncology Program at Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle, Washington and President and CEO of GRACE, Matthew Gubens, Thoracic Oncologist at the Thoracic Surgery and Oncology Clinic of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Center in San Francisco, California, and Jyoti Patel, Director of Thoracic Oncology at University of Chicago Medicine gathered post meeting to discuss new information from ASCO 2017 regarding lung cancer.   In this roundtable video, the doctors discuss Continuing Immunotherapy Beyond Progression.



 

 Please feel free to offer comments and raise questions in our Discussion Forums.


GRACE would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of this program

  
   
                   

 


Denise Brock

ASCO 2017 – Lung Cancer – Keytruda is Now Approved in Combination with Chemo for Advanced Non-Squamous NSCLC

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H. Jack West, MD
Medical Director
Thoracic Oncology Program Swedish Cancer Institute
President & CEO, GRACE
Matthew Gubens, MD
Thoracic Oncologist
Thoracic Surgery and Oncology Clinic
UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
Jyoti D. Patel, MD
Director Thoracic Oncology
University of Chicago Medicine

 

Drs. H. Jack West, Medical Director of the Thoracic Oncology Program at Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle, Washington and President and CEO of GRACE, Matthew Gubens, Thoracic Oncologist at the Thoracic Surgery and Oncology Clinic of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Center in San Francisco, California, and Jyoti Patel, Director of Thoracic Oncology at University of Chicago Medicine gathered post meeting to discuss new information from ASCO 2017 regarding lung cancer.   In this roundtable video, the doctors discuss Keytruda is Now Approved in Combination with Chemo for Advanced Non-Squamous NSCLC.



 

 Please feel free to offer comments and raise questions in our Discussion Forums.


GRACE would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of this program

  
   
                   

 


Dr West

Why I Don’t Favor an Front-Loaded Approach for Most Advanced NSCLC Patients

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To many, the recent FDA approval of a combination of chemotherapy and concurrent immunotherapy for the vast majority of patients with advanced (metastatic) non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) probably seems like a great idea. This approval was based on the more favorable results for the combination of the IV immunotherapy agent Keytruda (pembrolizumab) every 3 weeks along with first line carboplatin and Alimta (pemetrexed) as a the chemo backbone, compared to the same chemotherapy alone, in a relatively small randomized trial of 123 patients, called KEYNOTE-021g. The “g” part refers to this actually being just one portion of a much larger trial comparing chemo to the same chemo with Keytruda. The other arms haven’t panned out as favorably.

Importantly, when we talk about the arm of patients getting chemo combined with immunotherapy, we aren’t talking about improving survival. Instead, we’re talking about prolonging the time before patients showed significant progression of their cancer on scans, which leads us to switch to a new treatment. This “progression-free survival”, or PFS, was the primary goal of the trial, though the gold standard of what we should really want from our treatments is improvement in how long patients live. There’s a bit of a favorable trend for that, but that’s all. There was also a significant improvement in the fraction of patients who show major shrinkage of their cancer when Keytruda is added to chemotherapy.

Still, even if survival isn’t improved, the results seem promising enough, so what’s not to like? Continue reading


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