GRACE :: Lung Cancer

ROS1

Denise Brock

Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer Patient Forum 2017 – Presentations and Handouts

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Videos from the webcast Targeted Therapies Patient Forum 2017 are available for viewing, and for those who prefer to read the material, GRACE has made all speaker presentations and handouts available.  We have also included links to helpful social media and patient groups.  

Again, huge thanks to all of the faculty who spent their Saturday in Cleveland with our community, and thanks also to those organizations who sponsored this event – Astra Zeneca, Takeda, Boehringer Ingelheim, Ignyta, Novartis, Genentech, Caris, and Guardant Health.  

We started the day out with a warm welcome from our Forum Chair – Dr. Nathan Pennell.  For the full agenda, faculty list, presentations, and videos from the webcast, please visit the ‘webcast details’ page, available via this link.  For those who would like to view the presentations from the Targeted Therapies Patient Forum in Cleveland, please view and download all presentations and handouts here, or continue on for a list of what is available.   

The morning sessions kicked off with a warm welcome from Dr. Pennell.  

General Session
 
The Many Faces of Progression
Dr. Nathan Pennell, Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center  
Pennell – The Many Faces of Progression
 
The Role of Local Therapy
Dr. Shirish Gadgeel, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan  
Gadgeel – Local Therapy  
 
Biopsies & Re-biopsies
Dr. Karen Reckamp, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center 
Reckamp – Biopsy and Re-biopsy
 
The Question of Clinical Trials
Dr. Alice Shaw, Massachusetts General Hospital
Shaw – Question of Clinical Trials
 
The Crossroads:
Local Therapy, Chemo, Targeted  Therapy, or Immunotherapy?
Panel Discussion with Drs. Pennell,  Gadgeel, Reckamp, and Shaw, and patients John Cherol (EGFR), Matt  Hiznay (ALK), and Sara Whitlock (RET), Moderator: Dr. H. (Jack) West
 
After lunch the breakout discussions continued: 
 
ALK/ROS1
Dr. Alice Shaw, Dr. Shirish Gadgeel, and Matt Hiznay, ALK patient
Shaw ALK/ROS1 Breakout  
Gadgeel – ALK Breakout
Hiznay ALK Breakout 
ROS1ders Information
 
ALK-positive NSCLC: ALK Positive
“ALK Positive” on Facebook (closed group): https://www.facebook.com/groups/ALKPositive/ 
“ALK Positive Outreach” on Facebook (public group): https://www.facebook.com/groups/ALKPositiveOR/
 
ROS1-positive cancer (any cancer):  The ROS1ders
“ROS1 Positive (ROS1+) Cancer” on Facebook (private group):  https://www.facebook.com/groups/ROS1cancer/
“ROS1 Cancer Research Forum” on Facebook (public community): https://www.facebook.com/ROS1CancerResearchForum/
“The ROS1ders” website: http://ros1cancer.com
ROS1ders Information
 
EGFR
Dr. Nathan Pennell, Dr. H. (Jack) West, and John Cherol, EGFR patient
West – EGFR Acquired Resistance  
Pennell – EGFR Initial Treatment
 
EGFR-positive NSCLC
“LUNGevity EGFR Group” on Facebook (closed group): https://www.facebook.com/groups/EGFRlung/
EGFR-positive patients who have developed resistance to at least one TKI
EGFR Resisters Lung Cancer Patient Group” on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1992981107603006/
EGFR-positive Exon 20 insertion cancer (any cancer)
“Exon20 Group” website http://www.exon20group.org/
 
MET/RET/BRAF
Dr. Karen Reckamp, Dr. Vamsidhar  Velcheti, and Sara Whitlock, RET patient 
Reckamp – MET-RET-BRAF breakout
Velceti – MET RET Breakout
 
RET-positive NSCLC
“LUNGevity RET Group” on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1230457690298084/
 
The day concluded with the afternoon general session: 
 
General Session
 
Managing the Cost of Cancer Care
Dr. James P. Stevenson, Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center
Stevenson -Managing the Cost of Cancer Care
 
Patient to Patient Mentoring
Kathryn Sefcek, MHA, 4th Angel Mentoring Program  
4th Angel Mentoring Program Information
4th Angel Mentoring Program
 
Caveat Emptor: Assessing Cancer Information from Sources of  Varying Quality  
Dr. H. (Jack) West, Swedish Cancer Institute & Founder of  cancerGRACE, and Janet Freeman-Daily, ROS1 patient,  #LCSM Twitter Chat co- moderator, Cure  Today contributor, blogger.
West – Caveat Emptor: Assessing Cancer Information from Sources of Varying Quality
Find Trusted Online Info About Lung Cancer 

Please feel free to offer comments and raise questions in our Discussion Forums.


GRACE would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of this program

 


Denise Brock

Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer Patient Forum 2017 – It’s a Wrap!

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On Saturday, September 16, 2017, patients, caregivers, family members and friends joined GRACE in Cleveland at the Taussig Cancer Center for a full day of discussion on Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer.  We are thrilled that people joined us for this amazing and informative day.  Huge thanks to all of the faculty who spent their Saturday in Cleveland with our community, and thanks also to those organizations who sponsored this event – Astra Zeneca, Takeda, Boehringer Ingelheim, Ignyta, Novartis, Genentech, Caris, and Guardant Health.  

 

We started the day out with a warm welcome from our Forum Chair – Dr. Nathan Pennell.  For the full agenda, faculty list, presentations, and videos from the webcast, please visit the ‘webcast details’ page, available via this link.     

  Brain Power

The morning sessions continued:

The Many Faces of Progression
 Dr. Nathan Pennell
 Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center
The Role of Local Therapy
 Dr. Shirish Gadgeel
 Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan
 Biopsies & Re-biopsies
 Dr. Karen Reckamp
 City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center 
The Question of Clinical Trials
 Dr. Alice Shaw
 Massachusetts General Hospital
 The Crossroads:
 Local Therapy, Chemo, Targeted  Therapy, or Immunotherapy?
 Panel Discussion with Drs. Pennell,  Gadgeel, Reckamp, and Shaw,
 and patients John Cherol (EGFR), Matt  Hiznay (ALK),
 and Sara Whitlock (RET).
 Moderator: Dr. H. (Jack) West 
 
 
 
Lunch was an opportunity to have further discussion with the faculty.  Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center graciously allowed us to set up lunch on the 1st floor in their beautiful new facility.

 
 
 
 
After lunch the breakout discussions continued: 
 
ALK/ROS1
 Dr. Alice Shaw, Dr. Shirish Gadgeel,
 and Matt Hiznay, ALK patient
 EGFR
 Dr. Nathan Pennell, Dr. H. (Jack) West,
 and John Cherol, EGFR patient
 MET/RET/BRAF
 Dr. Karen Reckamp, Dr. Vamsidhar  Velcheti, and Sara Whitlock, RET patient 
 
The day concluded with the afternoon general session: 
Managing the Cost of Cancer Care
 Dr. James P. Stevenson
 Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center
 Patient to Patient Mentoring
 Kathryn Sefcek, MHA
 4th Angel Mentoring Program
 Caveat Emptor: Assessing Cancer Information from Sources of  Varying Quality  
 Dr. H. (Jack) West
 Swedish Cancer Institute & Founder of  cancerGRACE
 and Janet Freeman-Daily, ROS1 patient,  #LCSM Twitter Chat co- moderator, Cure  Today contributor, blogger
 

Please click here to visit the Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer Webcast page for viewing the videos in full!  (Please note, we will be editing the videos to cut them down – they are in raw format at this time).

 

 

Please feel free to offer comments and raise questions in our Discussion Forums.


GRACE would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of this program

 


Carlea

Three Reasons to Be Hopeful About Lung Cancer

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2016 Targeted Therapies Forum

The medical community has made significant progress in understanding that lung cancer is not a single cancer, and are treating it accordingly. We’ve stopped carpet bombing the body and have started using targeted weaponry to assassinate some forms of cancer. As a result, some patients are alive now, over a decade after being diagnosed with metastatic lung disease.

We can credit much of that progress to research into three specific mutations that drive distinctive forms of lung cancer. Instead of treating patients with these different mutations the same, we now give them individualized treatments that work differently based on their cancer’s mutation.

If you or someone you know is diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), there are three major subtypes the cancer should be tested for:

  1. ALK positive. A change in the cancer’s ALK gene allows the cancer cell to grow uncontrollably, but several drugs on the market have shown incredible responses and durations of disease control for patients. Even patients’ whose cancer has spread to the brain are now living years, not just weeks.
  2. ROS1 positive. A change in the cancer’s ROS1 gene, which is similar to the ALK gene, makes cancer cells grow and divide. Only one to two percent of lung cancer patients have it but with one highly effective drug on the market and several others being explored in clinical trials, even rare subtypes of cancers are focusing the attention of scientists, physicians, and the pharmaceutical industry alike.
  3. EGFR mutant. This was the first molecular marker that really showed a test done on lung cancer could predict who would respond to a specific targeted treatment. Now, our increased understanding of how the cancer can later evolve to grow in the presence of the first generation drugs has led to the development of next generation therapies which can regain cancer control in nearly 60% of cases, giving patients a second lease on life.

It is hard to overstate the awesomeness of these breakthroughs.

Around the world, a diagnosis of lung cancer leads to more cancer-related deaths than those from breast cancer, colorectal cancer, prostate cancer, and pancreas cancer combined. Yet for a growing number of distinct molecular subtypes of this disease, even advanced lung cancer can now be a controllable disease. Beyond the three subtypes described above, many other different mutations and genetic changes which could allow lung cancer therapy to be personalized are receiving testing in clinical trials. Most recently, the advent of immunotherapy – using drugs to stimulate the body’s own immune system to attack the lung cancer – has also shown promise, and how these two areas – personalized medicine and immunotherapy – will overlap and interact represent some of the major research directions for the future.

So, this is great news, right? Oncologists throughout the country are testing their patients’ tumors, and people are living longing and better than they could have ever imagined, yes?

No.

Despite all of this great news, many NSCLC patients do not get their tumors tested for ALK, ROS1, or EGFR mutations. Improving these numbers falls to the patients or their caregivers to educate themselves and advocate for molecular testing.

Fortunately, organizations like the Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education (GRACE) exist solely to help patients become shared decision makers when it comes to their cancer care

GRACE is working with the University of Colorado Cancer Center in Aurora to hold a patient event on Aug. 20th for those living with ALK, ROS1, or EGFR mutant lung cancers. The organizers have already solicited questions in advance from patients in the internet lung cancer community.

The Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer Patient Forum is open to patients and their caregivers. Renowned lung cancer experts from around the U.S. will present, and patients who are living with lung cancer will serve as moderators of the discussions that take place between the doctors and the audience.

The morning sessions will help attendees understand their mutation, learn of open clinical trials, and hear about treatment options;.all to help patients develop their plans A, B, C, and D. The afternoon will focus on survivorship in all its aspects, from finances to sex, to diet, to exercise – how to live life to the fullest with lung cancer.

Register today!

 


GRACE Video

Platinum-Based Chemo Doublets: Backbone for NSCLC Treatment

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GRACEcast-515_Lung_West_Platinum_Based_Chemo_Doublets_Backbone_NSCLC_Treatment

 

Dr. Jack West, Swedish Cancer Institute, identifies the platinum-based chemotherapy doublet as the backbone of first-line treatment for the majority of NSCLC patients.

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Transcript

The most common subtype of lung cancer is known as non-small cell lung cancer which comprises about 87% or 88% of all of the lung cancers out there. One of the big challenges in managing lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer specifically is that about half of patients are diagnosed at a time when they already have stage IV or metastatic disease. At that time, this is not a cancer that we can treat to cure it, but our goal is to prolong survival as much as possible and also to minimize the cancer-related symptoms, as well as the treatment-related side effects.

Over the last 10 to 15 years we’ve really clarified the best approach in terms of chemotherapy for the majority of people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Now, chemotherapy is the optimal approach for patients who do not have a so-called driver mutation, which is an uncommon mutation such as EGFR or ALK or ROS1 that you may hear about which are present in a minority of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but the majority of patients don’t have one of these driver mutations.

For that majority who don’t have a driver mutation, the optimal treatment approach is standard two-drug chemotherapy. This is specifically called a platinum-based doublet and it’s called that because the main component or the first component is a drug called cisplatin or carboplatin that has been studied for many years and is paired with another drug such as Taxol, also known as paclitaxel, or Taxotere, known as docetaxel as well, Gemzar, also known as gemcitabine, Alimta, also known as pemetrexed, or occasionally other agents.

These two-drug combinations have been compared in many trials and really shown to be essentially remarkably similar if not identical in efficacy. Because of that, we usually choose the treatment, the two-drug combination, to recommend based on issues such as convenience to the patient — some of them are every week administration, others are every three weeks; for some patients coming in a long distance, three-week treatment is much more convenient. Some have hair loss, some do not, and also some of these agents may be particularly a little more effective in some subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer — known as the particular histology, and others might be a better choice for a different histology.

We’re going to talk about that specific difference and which regimens we might exactly recommend for one subtype or another in other videos, but right now it’s important just to note that the mainstay of treatment for the patients who don’t have a driver mutation, in the first line setting, is a two-drug platinum-based combination — cisplatin or carboplatin, with a partner drug, and they really do seem to produce very comparable results.

We’ll talk about some potential specific differences in other videos.

Thanks.


GRACE Video

Crizotinib for First Line Treatment of ALK or ROS1 Rearrangements

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GRACE Cancer Video Library - Lung

GCVL_LU-FC01_Crizotinib_First_Line_Treatment_ALK_ROS1_Rearrangements

 

Dr. Ross Camidge, University of Colorado, explains the preference for crizotinib rather than platinum doublet chemotherapy as first line treatment for patients with ALK or ROS1 rearrangements.

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How Did You Like This Video?

Please feel free to offer comments and raise questions in our Discussion Forums.

 

Transcript

Increasingly across many molecular subtypes of lung cancer, we’ve seen that giving a targeted drug first is better than going on chemotherapy. It doesn’t mean there’s no role for chemotherapy, but you’re going to start playing your best card first.

We’ve certainly seen within randomized studies that going on crizotinib compared to first line — what’s called platinum doublet, two drug chemotherapy — going on the targeted therapy was better. There was a higher response rate; there was a longer time before the cancer progressed.

For ROS-1, because it’s a much smaller population it’s hard to do those big randomized studies, but I think most people believe that, and I think that’s why ROS-1 probably should be in the panel of things that people look for from the get go to see if there’s a tablet that can treat your cancer more than just chemotherapy from the start.


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