Lung radiation (30 gy ten times) can kill cancer 1.8×1.5 cm?

Home Forums Lung Cancer (old) General Lung/Thoracic Cancer Questions Lung radiation (30 gy ten times) can kill cancer 1.8×1.5 cm?

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  certain spring 2 years, 5 months ago.

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June 30, 2012 at 3:46 am  #12196    

andy99

My mom just had radiation on her lung. she found 1 node had progression and her onc sent her to radiation.

she finish radiaiton 10 round (30gy x 10) 1 month ago. Now she is develop coughing.

We don’t know is it work or not until scan PET/CT next time on August.

this is waiting time that nervous. someone has experience about lung radiation and got 30gy x 10 times please share to me. 30 gy ten round is enough to kill cancer on lung.

before that she had radiation on spine T5 1 node with 80gy ten round and tumor on T5 dissapear so I don’t know this time she got only 30gy ten round is enough or not to kill cancer on RML lung.


Mom 70 year old. NSCLC Stage 4, adenocarcinoma. bone met (spine, neck, pelvis)
Tarceva first line. second PET/CT Scan show 2 node progression and radiation that 2 node. Now develop coughing after radiation.

  • This topic was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by  andy99.
  • This topic was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by  andy99.
June 30, 2012 at 5:13 am  #12200    

certain spring

Andy, just to recap for the doctors, you mentioned in an earlier post that your mother is 70 years old and Stage IV adenocarcinoma, with bone metastases. You also said that she was taking Tarceva.
I am not a doctor but I am stage IV, like your mother, and I have had radiation to my lung. Radiation for stage IV patients is usually given as a “palliative” treatment – ie to control or shrink the cancer, not to “kill” it. My treatment worked very well and I am very happy to have had it, but it didn’t kill the cancer.
Post-radiation coughing is common. Sometimes people’s lungs become inflamed, which can lead to a condition called “radiation pneumonitis”. It would be worth reporting the cough to your mother’s doctor, as with any new symptom that she has.
Could you do us a forum signature as it is important that the doctors can see brief details of your mother’s diagnosis and treatments so far? You go to the Profile page via your user name. Here is a thread on how to do it:
http://cancergrace.org/topic/grace-site-tips-profile-bio-forum-signature


49-year-old non-smoker, dx stage IV NSCLC May 2010 (squamous tumour of the left lung with multiple brain metastases). Radiotherapy to chest and brain; progressed through two cycles carbo/gemcitabine. Repeated lung collapses; pneumonia in collapsed lung, Nov 2010; bronchial stent placed, Dec 2010. Declined second-line Taxotere. Mutation testing Feb 2011, surprise EGFR exon deletion 19. Started Tarceva (150mg), Feb 2011. Progression in liver and elsewhere, May 2013.

June 30, 2012 at 9:08 am  #12211    

andy99

certain spring

I think If radiation cannot do many times. If it cannot kill cancer, only shrink it then it will come back soon.
example : if you radiation 2-3 month and cancer come back and you still have develop cough because of side effect of radiation last time. Is it worth to radiation it?


Mom 70 year old. NSCLC Stage 4, adenocarcinoma. bone met (spine, neck, pelvis)
Tarceva first line. second PET/CT Scan show 2 node progression and radiation that 2 node. Now develop coughing after radiation.

June 30, 2012 at 2:36 pm  #12235    

Dr. Weiss

Radiation has one major strength, and 1 major weakness. The strength is that where you shine the radiation beam, radiation is very good at killing cancer cells. This killing can relieve pain (for example, when cancer presses on a nerve or grows in bone), or can stop cancer from pushing on a vital structure (such as an airway or the spinal cord). The major weakness of radiation is that it only kills cells where you shine the beam, and nowhere else. For this reason, radiation in stage IV disease is not known to improve survival despite being a powerful tool towards controlling local symptoms or preventing symptoms in a particular spot.


Jared Weiss, MD
Lead Medical Oncologist

Views expressed here represent my opinion, not those of GRACE or University of North Carolina. This information does not constitute medical advice and is intended to supplement and not replace medical information provided by your doctor.

June 30, 2012 at 5:13 pm  #12241    

Dr West

Yes, really just to reiterate what Dr. Weiss said, it is unfortunate that in the setting of metastatic lung cancer, radiation really cannot be expected to be curative, so radiation is given with the goal of shrinking/controlling the cancer in the area where the radiation is administered, but there it isn’t clearly critical to focus intently on killing every last cancer cell in one area while the cancer is able to grow in other areas.

-Dr. West


Howard (Jack) West, MD
Medical Oncologist

Views expressed here represent my opinion, not those of GRACE or Swedish Cancer Institute. This information does not constitute medical advice and is intended to supplement and not replace medical information provided by your doctor.

June 30, 2012 at 9:32 pm  #12249    

andy99

Dr. west, Dr. Weiss,

Can you share to me about how many gy can radiation to lung (RML)?

30 gy is enough?


Mom 70 year old. NSCLC Stage 4, adenocarcinoma. bone met (spine, neck, pelvis)
Tarceva first line. second PET/CT Scan show 2 node progression and radiation that 2 node. Now develop coughing after radiation.

June 30, 2012 at 10:47 pm  #12250    

Dr West

It depends on the amount given per treatment, but up to 70-74 Gy is sometimes used. If the amount given is larger each day, this has a bigger effect, so a smaller total dose is equal in biological effect to smaller doses given to a higher total dose.

The dose given may well be enough, particularly in the setting of metastatic cancer, where the goal is to shrink the cancer, but there isn’t a clear value to killing every last cancer cell (because there are other areas of active cancer in the body.

-Dr. West


Howard (Jack) West, MD
Medical Oncologist

Views expressed here represent my opinion, not those of GRACE or Swedish Cancer Institute. This information does not constitute medical advice and is intended to supplement and not replace medical information provided by your doctor.

July 1, 2012 at 5:47 am  #12256    

certain spring

Andy99, the way I think about it is that radiation can help buy some extra time and comfort. Sometimes, during that extra time, a treatment can be found that will work for the whole body (“systemic”), instead of just for the local area. In your mother’s case, with luck the radiation will keep the cancer in the lung under control long enough for the Tarceva to get to work on the whole body. I hope that’s what happens. All best.


49-year-old non-smoker, dx stage IV NSCLC May 2010 (squamous tumour of the left lung with multiple brain metastases). Radiotherapy to chest and brain; progressed through two cycles carbo/gemcitabine. Repeated lung collapses; pneumonia in collapsed lung, Nov 2010; bronchial stent placed, Dec 2010. Declined second-line Taxotere. Mutation testing Feb 2011, surprise EGFR exon deletion 19. Started Tarceva (150mg), Feb 2011. Progression in liver and elsewhere, May 2013.

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