mucosal adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

Portal Forums Cancer Basics General Cancer Basics mucosal adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

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December 30, 2013 at 8:13 am  #1261269    

kidz

My pathology report from esophageal biopsies taken on December 3, 2013, came back with findings of a few areas of high dysplasia and one finding of mucosal adenocarcinoma. Do I have cancer?

December 30, 2013 at 9:47 am  #1261270    
catdander forum moderator
catdander forum moderator

Dear kidz, I wonder how the heck you got a pathology report without talking to a doctor about it first. A website is a heck of an awful way to find you may have cancer. No one here can say whether or not you have cancer, but I’m sorry to say the wording of “mucosal adenocarcinoma” refers to a type of cancer found in the esophagus.

One thing that stood out when I googled it was there seems that recent research is changing treatment to a less invasive process. It appears some of the larger institutions have already adopted this approach. Moving forward it may be possible for you to visit one of those institutions for an opinion.

At this time we don’t have experts in esophageal cancer. I hope you speak with your doctor as soon as possible to get an understanding of what’s going on. For the most part doctors don’t want patients looking at these reports before a discussion for this very reason. I hope there’s a misunderstanding somewhere.

Janine

December 30, 2013 at 9:57 am  #1261271    

kidz

Thank you for the response, Cat. I appreciate it.

Seriously, I have had Barretts since I was 14 — that’s 43 years. I get regular biopsies, and we have revisited options over the years. However, aside from occasional esophageal ulcers, there have been no changes in the Barretts. When the doctor told me about the report — I told myself “OK. A little cancerous cell or two.” I don’t get too upset about stuff. I haven’t told many people — my husband, my mom, and a brother. They figure since it isn’t cancer yet it’s no big deal. So, I wonder whether it is cancer or not.

I am supposed to be going in the middle of January for a thermal ablation. I just thought I should make a connection somewhere. I’m still thinking I must be imagining something. It’s a all still a little weird.

If there is no one here who knows about esophagus stuff, I would be glad for you to delete my post. Thank you.

December 30, 2013 at 10:40 am  #1261272    
catdander forum moderator
catdander forum moderator

It won’t be deleted, we never do that unless it’s’ inappropriate. One of our doctors will probably comment even if they don’t have an expertise in the field they’re all oncologists and yours in particular is a pretty basic question.

Since you’re looking for support I’ll give 2 cents, ;) I’d look around some and see what’s going on in the field and get better acquainted with the latest standards before moving forward. Adenocarcinoma is cancer and probably more than a cell or two. Assume to best but prepare.

From http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/708711_4 The “discussion” section on the final page reads, “In this large cohort study we studied outcomes after the endoscopic and surgical treatment of mucosal (T1a) EAC and found that overall survival and cumulative mortality rates were comparable between the 2 cohorts. This was despite patients in the ENDO group being older and having greater comorbidity than those in the SURG group.”
This retrospective study at Mayo Clinic looks like you fit into the group being studied; (pg 2 “study design”) “Patients were either referred for endoscopic treatment of mucosal EAC to the Barrett’s Esophagus Unit by physicians or were under surveillance for high-grade dysplasia (HGD) in the BE Unit.”

I hope the ablation does what it needs to do and gets rid of the cancer and precancer cells.

I find Mayo has a good website to find definitions and explanations. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/search/search

All best,
Janine

December 30, 2013 at 11:51 am  #1261274    

kidz

Thank you, Janine. I have been reading over the links that you posted and really appreciate that you took time to post them. I wish you all the best, as well.

Helen

December 30, 2013 at 5:39 pm  #1261279    

cards7up

Helen, dysplasia is the pre-cancer and adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer. As Janine has said, talk with your doctor and maybe also get a second opinion on your path slides. Take care, Judy


Stage IIIA adeno, dx 7/2010. SRS then chemo carbo/alimta 4x. NED as of 10/2011.
Local recurrence, surgery to remove LRL 8/29/13. 5.2cm involved pleura. Chemo carbo/alimta x3. NED

December 30, 2013 at 6:26 pm  #1261282    
Dr West
Dr West

I don’t know that you need a second opinion on the pathology. Unfortunately, the finding of adenocarcinoma means that there is cancer present, but a doctor working with you would be in the position to provide a recommendations of how to proceed once the diagnosis is made.

Good luck.

-Dr. West

January 2, 2014 at 10:27 am  #1261317    

kidz

Thank you all. I appreciate your comments. I am awaiting the appointment for the ablation. At that time they plan further biopsies and an endoscopic ultrasound. I suppose that will give more answers about the nature of the cancer. Guess I’m due for another ride down the rapids. I’m just going to hang on and try to keep a good grip on the oars.

January 11, 2014 at 8:50 am  #1261474    

kidz

My doctor has scheduled a second upper GI to gather additional information and make a plan. I have 7 children ages 13 – 32, additional family, and friends. At what point does a person tell others about the diagnosis? How?

I don’t know if this is the place for this type of conversation, but I need to know. Thank you

Helen

January 11, 2014 at 4:38 pm  #1261482    
catdander forum moderator
catdander forum moderator

It’s perfectly fine to have this conversation and hopefully some of our members who’ve gone through it will have some insight. My first thought is you know your children best and may well know how it should be done but who can?

Below are a couple of posts none specifically about your question but they may help.

http://cancergrace.org/coping-with-cancer/2009/09/18/getting-your-mind-around-cancer/

http://cancergrace.org/coping-with-cancer/2009/04/29/denial-coping-mechanism/

http://cancergrace.org/coping-with-cancer/2008/05/12/thoughts-on-the-last-lecture/

As well there is an entire section on coping with cancer that you may find helpful. It can be found in the drop down menu above entitled “General Cancer Info” or here’s the link,

http://cancergrace.org/coping-with-cancer/

I hope this helps getting you started,
Janine

October 18, 2016 at 3:12 am  #1288929    

kidz

Wow. I just found this and thought I would post an update. Here is my experience. After several ablations over several months, my cancer returned. I was referred to Mass General where I February of 2015 they did a partial Esophajectomy (sp). They went in from the left side and were unable to get margins thry Wa√Īted as they were afraid of losing blood supply. In February of 2016 the cancer had returned. In April I was scheduled for a colon interposition at Dartmouth Hitchcock. In April, I had the surgery. They were able to go in from the right side this time, dissect old scars and get the tissue they needed while maintaining the blood supply, so they did another esophajectomy. I had two rounds of chemo. I go in for follow up next week. I’m back to work part time mixing paint at a local hardware store. I tire easily, but Sunday I hiked a mountain.

I just thought I’d send along an update so you wouldn’t be up in the air about my condition. I’ll send this out to cyberspace now. God is with you all.

October 18, 2016 at 6:27 am  #1288930    
JimC Forum Moderator
JimC Forum Moderator

Hi kidz,

Thanks for the update. It’s good to hear that you’re fighting the good fight (and hiking a mountain…wow!), and I hope that you get great results from your follow-up.

Looking forward to good news from you soon.

JimC
Forum moderator


Jul 2008 Wife Liz (51/never smoker) Dx Stage IV NSCLC EGFR exon 19
4 cycles Carbo/alimta, 65% shrinkage
Tarceva maintenance
Mar 2010 progression, added Alimta, stable
Sep 2010 multiple brain mets, WBR
Oct 2010 large pericardial effusion, tamponade
Jan 2011 progression, start abraxane
Jun 2011-New liver, brain mets, add Tarceva
Oct 2011-Dx Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis; pulsed Tarceva
At rest Nov 4 2011
Since then: http://cancergrace.org/blog/jim-and-lisa

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