GRACE :: Lung Cancer

How Do Patients Decide Where to Seek Cancer Treatment?

Cancer is both a terrible, terrifying disease and big business.  With costs of care rising and delivery of medicine changing, independent private practice groups are increasingly uncommon and sole practitioners are rare.   Cancer care is now becoming consolidated as a system of larger institutions and networks, whether academic or private. And they build business with marketing and a keen eye on competition.

These institutions are targeting market niches with major campaigns. Smaller, local centers may focus on the opportunity to get cancer care close to home. Other centers feature cutting edge care and clinical trials. Still others highlight integrative care and holistic, emotional support. 

So … how does a patient choose where to go for treatment?  Are the treatment methods effective?  How do the facility’s results compare to outcomes elsewhere?  How can you determine if the care is as good as the facility claims? 

Our upcoming #LCSM tweet chat on Thursday, January 29 at 8PM ET/5PM PT will address what impacts cancer patient decisions about where to receive care. Obviously, different people select all kinds of cancer centers because they prioritize different things. So we’ll turn to questions around marketing cancer care and how important and effective it is. Specifically, we’ll cover the following questions during the hour:

T1: What factors are most important in deciding where to seek cancer care? Referring doc? Friends? Marketing? Web ratings?

T2: Do you believe marketing claims about cancer care? What impressed? Disappointed?

T3: Many marketing campaigns are case testimonials. Are personal stories still more effective than stats?

T4: Does access to newest drugs, technology and clinical trials motivate patients to drive >1 hr or get on a plane?

T5: Do most patients make the best choice for their care? Are some misled by bad referrals or inaccurate advertising?

To join, just search for hashtag #LCSM during the hour of the chat and add “#LCSM” to your tweets to add comments (or go to tchat.io and sign in). Hope to see you there!

References Continue reading


Breakthroughs in Lung Cancer from 2014 from Thomas John, MD

Dr. Thomas John of the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Center in Melbourne, Australia presents his favorite breakthroughs in lung cancer from 2014.

For those who wish to access the PDF, it’s here: Thomas John, MD Top Four Lung Cancer Highlights 2014

Agree? Disagree? What are you looking forward to in 2015?


Dr. Geoffrey Oxnard: My Top Highlight in Lung Cancer from 2014 – Liquid Biopsies

There were many advances in lung cancer targeted treatments in 2014. The one that most excites Dr. Geoffrey Oxnard from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is the use of liquid biopsies.


My Top Five Highlights in Lung Cancer from 2014

An annual tradition is a reflection on the key developments in the field over the past year. This year saw some major advances, with several of the biggest changes bubbling just below the surface and about to really break out in 2015.  So without further adieu, here’s my list.

For those who wish to access the pdf, it’s here: Top 5 Highlights in Lung Cancer 2014

Agree? Disagree? What’s highest on your wish list for 2015?


Cyramza, New Angiogenesis Inhibitor, Approved with Taxotere for Second Line NSCLC: Let’s Review Why

It may not be the biggest present lung cancer patients could get for the holiday season, but the FDA just yesterday approved Cyramza (ramucirimab), an anti-angiogenic antibody with a mechanism similar to Avastin (bevacizumab) that is already approved for gastric cancer, as a new agent to treat previously treated advanced NSCLC, any histology. This was based on the phase III randomized trial called REVEL that was presented at ASCO 2014, so let’s review the evidence that led to this approval. 

The REVEL trial randomized 1253 patients with metastatic NSCLC of any histology (i.e., including squamous) who had received prior platinum-based doublet therapy as first line treatment to receive standard Taxotere (docetaxel), the FDA-approved cornerstone of second-line therapy, with either Cyramza at 10 mg/kg once every 21 days or placebo on that same interval until significant progression or prohibitive side effects. Patients could have received Cyramza’s cousin Avastin in the first line setting, but only about 10% of patients did.

The trial was looking for a significant improvement in overall survival (OS) and was technically a positive study.  Both the median progression-free survival (PFS) and median OS improved by about 1.5 months with the addition of Cyramza. Continue reading


Ask Us, Q&A
Lung/Thoracic Cancer Expert Content

Archives

Immunotherapy Patient Forum 2014 Videos

 


GRACE Website Rebuild

Acquired Resistance Forum Videos

 

ALK+ Lung Cancer Patient Forum Videos

Join the GRACE Faculty

Breast Cancer Blog
Pancreatic Cancer Blog
Kidney Cancer Blog
Bladder Cancer Blog
Head/Neck Cancer Blog

Subscribe to the GRACEcast Podcast on iTunes

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon

Subscribe to
GRACE Notes
   (Free Newsletter)

Other Resources

ClinicalTrials.gov


Biomedical Learning Institute

peerview_institute_logo_243