Second line or clinical trial? - 1254176

Mon, 02/25/2013 - 07:17

I was just wondering if there are any resources surrounding this decision point. What is the general thinking or factors to consider at this juncture?

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catdander

Oh yes there are resources, There is quite a list of "further reading options at the end of this discussion. http://cancergrace.org/lung/2010/10/04/lung-cancer-faq-2nd-line-nsclc-o…

At any juncture there is reason to explore trial options in your area. All trials have criteria one must meet usually the more treatment one has had the fewer options there are. A search at clinicaltrials.gov can be very helpful. Our search engine is also quite good though you may need to log out depending on your browser. http://cancergrace.org/cancer-101/2011/11/13/an-insider’s-guide-to-the-second-opinion/

Janine
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Dr West

Not much to add. We always want to consider an appealing clinical trial, especially if it might give access to a treatment approach not currently available as an "off the shelf" therapy.

Good luck.

-Dr. West

catdander

Yeah, I've never quite understood exactly how that's figured. One may be able to argue that alimta was switch maintenance if it was given directly after first line or at least before progression. Then trialists I think tend to define things like lines of treatment vs maintenance for their particular trial and independent of a set of rules for all trials.

Dr West

As for the question of maintenance therapy and line of therapy, it's a very appropriate question to ask, especially since many lung cancer specialists think of switch maintenance therapy (moving to a new treatment after completing a fixed number of cycles of first line chemotherapy) as early second line therapy. The main distinction in terms of semantics is just that it's called second line if someone demonstrated progression of their cancer before starting a new treatment. If yes, subsequent treatment is generally considered early second line therapy. If no, it's generally defined as maintenance therapy.

-Dr. West