Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) is an unusual subtype of lung cancer; medical oncologist Dr. Jack West reviews the evidence on the best systemic therapy to treat advanced, multifocal BAC.

Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), also known as adenocarcinoma in situ, is an unusual subtype of lung cancer with its own appearance under a microscope and on imaging. Dr. Jack West introduces some of the basics of the unique features of BAC. Download PDF Transcript TranscriptOne of the unusual

Unfortunately, there is as much misinformation as good information about the unusual subtype of lung cancer known as bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) or adenocarcinoma in situ. Dr. Jack West reviews the top 5 myths. Download PDF Transcript TranscriptOne of the unusual subtypes of lung cancer is

Dr. David Harpole, Duke University Medical Center, describes how he assists patients with the surgical decision-making process.

Dr. Jack West, Swedish Cancer Institute, compares the mechanism of action, efficacy and toxicity of PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors.

UCLA Med Center's Dr. Eddie Garon discusses the open question of the optimal duration of ongoing treatment with immunotherapy for lung cancer.

Dr. Eddie Garon considers the data on immunotherapies for first line treatment of advanced NSCLC and whether we are likely to use these agents instead of or in combination with standard chemotherapy soon.

Dr. Jeffrey Bradley, Radiation Oncologist at Washington University in St. Louis, provides trial evidence showing that patients may not benefit from high dose chest radiation therapy vs. standard dose therapy.

Dr. Mark Socinski, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, describes the different types of stage III (locally advanced) NSCLC, and states which of these types tend to be resectable.

Dr. Mark Socinski, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, defines the three compartments in stage III (locally advanced) NSCLC, each of which must be treated.

Lung Cancer Video Library

Dr. Mark Socinski, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, describes the primary treatment options for stage IIIA NSCLC, including chemoradiation and surgery, and discusses trial evidence for each approach.

Dr. Mark Socinski, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, compares the use of chemotherapy to chemo/radiation in the preoperative setting in stage IIIA lung cancer.

Dr. Mark Socinski, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, discusses the factors to consider in defining resectability in stage IIIa lung cancer.

Dr. Mark Socinski, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, describes strategies for treatment of the elderly and frail patient with locally advanced NSCLC.

Dr. Mark Socinski, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, discusses the benefits of giving two additional cycles of chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy for stage III NSCLC.