Help Needed Interpreting Some Words on Latest 3-month CT Scan Lungs - 1295111

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cbwriter
Help Needed Interpreting Some Words on Latest 3-month CT Scan Lungs - 1295111

Hi friends –

Hoping you all can provide some insight if you can. I really would love those in the know to interpret what some terms mean with reference to my wife’s 3-month CT scan with and without contrast.

Back story: She has multiple nodules in both lungs, found as incidentals back in the summer of 2016. Since then, VATS surgery, CT scans every 3 months, PET scan that did have hypermetabolic activity on one nodule, and 6 treatments of SBRT in the fall of 2017 as a result of a biopsy that revealed adenocarcinoma non small cell lung cancer stage 1. VATS in 09/15 with genetic testing showed everything negative except BRIP1 positive.

They did not do any genetic testing from the FNA from this latest biopsy in October of 2017.

Latest CT scan from today reveals everything is stable, no new growths or changes except this:

“A bilobed density in the left lower lobe noted previously has become more solid in appearance although the size and configuration remain stable. This is of uncertain significance. Other scattered small nodule densities bilaterally are unchanged in size and number.”

It also says the focal density noted peripherally in the left lower lobe has become more nodule-like, although unchanged in size, measuring about 1 cm.

We see the oncologist on the 30th.

My questions:
1. What is bilobed density? I know bilobed means in general, but what does it mean as it pertains to the shape of this nodule? Is this a good thing?
2. It is now more solid in appearance. Everything I am reading from the American Cancer Society and other places is that solid nodules are less likely to be malignant. Thoughts? Is this a good thing? Do nodules that change to solid without any other changes raise a red flag?
3. What does it mean that the focal density has become more nodule like? Is this a good thing?

Thanks so much!
Carol

JimC
Hi Carol,

Hi Carol,

Congratulations on what appears to be a stable scan. I've looked into the issue of bilobed densities, and nothing I've found indicates that shape is more or less likely to be cancer. Dr. West discusses other imaging features of nodelues here: http://cancergrace.org/lung/2007/11/10/risk-of-ca-among-spns/

As you can see there are various factors in play, so it's difficult to say whether there is enough information from the scan report to make a judgment. But no growth is alwats a good finding.

I hope you get good news from your oncologist.

JimC
Forum moderator

<p>I began visiting GRACE in July, 2008 when my wife Liz was diagnosed with lung cancer, and became a forum moderator in January, 2010. My beloved wife of 30 years passed away Nov. 4, 2011 after battling stage IV lung cancer for 3 years and 4 months</p>

cbwriter
Ty so much for the fast reply

Ty so much for the fast reply. That's what we were thankful for: no growth at this time. It did grow slowly over a year from 8 mm to 9 then to a cm but the oncologist said they are just watching it.

Here's what I could use some major help understanding: It is now more solid in appearance. Everything I am reading from the American Cancer Society and other places is that solid nodules are less likely to be malignant. Thoughts? Is this a good thing? Do nodules that change to solid without any other changes raise a red flag?

I appreciate you very much, Jim!

onthemark
Hi cbwriter,

Hi cbwriter,

I also have a mix of ground glass and solid nodules but have graduated to yearly scans for now as nothing is changing. Pathology on my surgical specimen showed one AAH, one AIS and one invasive adenocarcinoma. Having remaining lesions on the scans,this is a situation where the absence of change, or very slow change, is what is important.

It is one thing if the nodule starts as solid and grows. It is a different situation if the nodule starts out as a hazy patch or ground glass and develops a solid component.

The latter can be an indication of transformation to a more malignant form of disease (i.e. from precancerous AAH to frank invasive adenocarcinoma for instance). However, if the solid component of the lesion is less than 5 mm it is 'minimally invasive' and not as dangerous.

These can also be very slow growing and there is no need to be in a rush to treat any individual one in the context of lungs with bilateral ggos. If one lesionstarts to take off and it's growth dominates the overall picture where everything else is stable, there is a practise to 'take out the lead runner' with local treatment as Dr. West has mentioned in his posts.

However 'more solid in appearance', which is what is written in your report, sounds less definitive than 'developing a solid component'. I am not sure what to make of that except it indicates gradual change rather than sudden change.

cbwriter
WOW, very interesting, and

WOW, very interesting, and thanks for your prompt reply, onthemark.

I really hope the oncologist does not want to do anything at this point. She's been doing so well and scheduled for knee replacement surgery (unrelated). She's seen a gynocologist, urologist, proctologist, and all the necessary tests have been fine. She saw a cardiologist and got a clean bill of health.

I just am uneasy on the report that says "A bilobed density in the left lower lobe noted previously has become more solid in appearance although the size and configuration remain stable. This is of uncertain significance."

catdander
Hi cbwriter,

Hi cbwriter,

It's so good to hear your wife has been doing well. I can't explain BAC as well as onthemark just did. On the subject of radiologists' reporting there is no standardized terminology so it would be dangerous to make assumptions about differences in wording. But asking her oncologist about the meaning would be a good idea.
I'm assuming you've read all that Dr. West has written on the subject of BAC, So you probably know there will be the risk the BAC will transform into a solid and or more aggressive cancer. Hence watching closely. I'd imagine specifying bilobed was just to to specify which nodule that was becoming more solid. The solid part being of uncertain significance not the bilobed shape. Again a question best answered by oncologist.

Hoping for the best,
Janine

cbwriter
Understood. Thanks so much

Understood. Thanks so much for replying to me. <3

cbwriter
I wanted to thank everyone

I wanted to thank everyone who replied and provide an update. The doctor explained that the bilobed shape was how the radiologist described the nodule. It is a small nodule and at this point, we just watch it. As for the solid nature that it partially has, he said he would be more concerned if it changed in size. So a very good visit and thank you all for your kindness and knowledge.

Carol

catdander
That's good news! I hope y

That's good news! I hope y'all just watch that nodule do nothing for all time.

Best of luck
Janine

cbwriter
Wags of gratitude, me too -

Wags of gratitude, me too - <3