Repeating Full Genomic Panel When KRAS Is The Driver Mutation - 1291212

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cat11
Repeating Full Genomic Panel When KRAS Is The Driver Mutation - 1291212

If a patient had full genomic testing at diagnosis and learned they have a KRAS driver mutation, is there any benefit, to this patient, of doing full genomic testing again at progression? (Especially, given the cost of these tests)

I've never heard of a KRAS mutation changing.

Thank you, Cathy

catdander
Hi Cathy,

Hi Cathy,

Just 2 or 3 years ago most oncologists would agree that if you have adeno nsclc egfr, ros1, and alk testing would be enough. Today more mutations are being tested and some drugs being tested are showing promise.

The thought is still, if you have one driver mutation it's highly unlikely you'll have another. On the other hand tumors develop mutations to resist treatments. There still are no new mutations for which there are FDA approved treatments past the ones mentioned above. Though with kras mutation it's probable you won't have a high enough PDL-1 number but it's worth testing for because immunotherapies have shown efficacy in those with a high percentage of PDL-1 expressed on tumors. (I think there's also talk about the amount of PD-1 expression on its receptors, though I don't know what happened with using the amount of pd-1 on receptors as an indicator of efficacy).

I'd start here: The following article (is an exciting resourse find) is from a site that is new to me but the authors are also contributors on Grace. It give detailed info on the status of, Genotypes with suggested off-label targeted therapies and Genotypes with targeted therapies offered on trial only.
https://www.uptodate.com/contents/personalized-genotype-directed-therapy...

I don't know if there's anything new to you in this video but it is up to date, http://cancergrace.org/lung/2016/04/08/gcvl_lu_multiplex_testing_rare_mu...

This recent video speaks about retesting and blood testing. (Though all the fda approved blood tests are related to egfr which isn't something that would be expected to be found in one with a kras mutation there may be a trial that is testing for other acquired mutations that would relate to you)
http://cancergrace.org/lung/2016/01/20/gcvl_lu_bloodbased_mutation_testi...

I hope this will get you thinking in the right direction.
All best,
Janine

cat11
Janine,

Janine,
Thank you very much for the links...very good articles and videos that I know I will be referring back to. I don't think full genomic testing would make sense for me, if I progress any time soon. Maybe if/when more mutations are discovered to be tested for, but as of right now, I don't think I would uncover anything worthwhile.
Cathy

catdander
Cathy,

Cathy,

I understand the wish or should I say need to plan for the next thing but I think you're right about not deciding until you're there. Who knows what will be what by then. I hope it's a long time before you need to make that move.

All best,
Janine

cat11
Janine,

Janine,

Have you ever heard of a KRAS mutation mutating to something other than another KRAS mutation?

I have a friend, who is on an ALK Facebook group, and thinks there are people in the group who originally had a KRAS driver and have become EGFR or ALK positive. Could she be mistaken?

Thank you, Cathy

JimC
Hi Cathy,

Hi Cathy,

Although it's possible that a patient could develop a new EGFR or ALK mutation at some point after initial biopsy/diagnosis, I think it's more likely that such patients had EGFR or ALK mutated cells that weren't picked up in the initial biopsy. Those cells multiplied over time to the point where a new biopsy detected them.

JimC
Forum moderator

<p>I began visiting GRACE in July, 2008 when my wife Liz was diagnosed with lung cancer, and became a forum moderator in January, 2010. My beloved wife of 30 years passed away Nov. 4, 2011 after battling stage IV lung cancer for 3 years and 4 months</p>