Differences in Never-Smoker vs. Current/Ex-Smokers Receiving Chemo

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A quick point on the importance of biology over treatment. Years ago, I highlighted the results in the TRIBUTE trial of chemo with placebo or combined with erlotinib (tarceva) at the same time (biomarker study abstract here), which showed that patients with EGFR mutations had a much better survival whether they received an EGFR inhibitor or not:

Tales from the Clinic: Mucinous BAC

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In my last post I outlined the typical clinical scenario for pneumonic bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), which is typically the mucinous subtype of this unusual disease. In fact, we are still actively learning a great deal about BAC, enough for the lung cancer experts to begin to develop a more sophisticated view that the mucinous and non-mucinous subtypes have different behaviors and respond differently to treatments.

Tales from the Clinic: Anne S and her Indolent Metastatic NSCLC

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Let's return to what happened with Anne S., who I introduced in the last post. The highlights are that I met this woman in September of 2005, when she was 79, slowing down from many medical issues unrelated to cancer, wary about chemo, and with a cancer that was metastatic but that had progressed only minimally in the months between the initial detection of her cancer and when I first saw her. We agreed that attentive follow-up made sense.

Iressa vs. Standard Chemo in Asian Never- or Light Ex-Smokers: Results of the IPASS Trial

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The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress, similar to ASCO but based in Europe, has been going on in Stockholm, where the results of a study called the First Line Iressa versus Carboplatin/Paclitaxel in Asia Study (taking some liberties to force it into the acronym "IPASS") was presented in the Presidential Symposium by my friend and Hong Kong-based colleague Tony Mok.

What I Really Do: Advanced Lung Cancer in Never-Smokers (LCINS)

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We’re recognizing more and more that lung cancer in never-smokers (LCINS) is a distinct disease, with different patterns of who gets it, how the cancer behaves, and it responds to treatments. But this recognition is still a work in progress, coming from a background in which the party line has been that NSCLC is treated the same regardless of the histologic type (squamous, adenocarcinoma, large cell, or other), smoking history, or other factors.

Japanese Study Demonstrates Elderly Patients Benefit from Post-Operative Chemo

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In Japan, a different chemotherapy approach than cisplatin doublet chemo has been used in the post-operative setting. In contrast to the North American and European approach of 3-4 cycles of platinum-based chemo, in Japan they have studied an oral chemotherapy called UFT, a combination of uracil and tegafur. This combination is in the same family as an old chemo drug called 5-FU that is still used in various settings today, although not commonly in lung cancer.

Tarceva (Erlotinib) in the Elderly

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One of the initial appeals of targeted therapies like tarceva (erlotinib) was that they may have fewer side effects and emerge as an alternative to standard chemo for some people. And one of the most appealing areas for offering a good alternative to standard chemo has been in the setting of older patients, who may be more wary of side effects and/or have additional medical problems than younger patients.