What is Stereotactic Radiosurgery/Radiation Therapy to the Brain or Body?

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GRACE Cancer Video Library - Lung

GCVL_LU_D07b_Stereotactic_Radiosurgery_Radiation_Therapy_Brain_Body

 

Dr. Jeffrey Bradley, Radiation Oncologist at Washington University in St. Louis, describes the use of stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiation therapy.

 

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Stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiation therapy are techniques used to deliver high doses of radiation therapy with very tight dose distributions to one or a few lesions, let’s say in the brain or in the body. If it’s a single fraction of treatment, it’s called stereotactic radiosurgery. The classic example of that is radiosurgery to a brain metastasis, or something like that.

Stereotactic radiation therapy, or stereotactic body radiation therapy uses five or fewer fractions — so somewhere between two and five fractions, and sites for that can be brain, lung, liver, spine, various places throughout the body where you really want to deliver a high dose that eradicates the tumor, kills the tumor cells, and do it with minimal normal tissue toxicity.

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