adenocarcinoma with bac features multifocal - 1268698

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magazine2
adenocarcinoma with bac features multifocal - 1268698

aer there any new treatments for this type of cancer. What is the survical rate, has it changed.??

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JimC
Hi magazine2,

Hi magazine2,

There are always new treatments which are being tested for lung cancer, although not necessarily for adenocarcinoma with BAC features, since this is really a hybrid type of lung cancer which can be treated like any lung adenocarcinoma. A patient's cancer may be more or less BAC-like, so it's not possible to generalize about which types of treatment may be best; it's a prime example of the kind of situation in which care should be individualized.

You may find these links helpful:

http://cancergrace.org/lung/2014/12/26/breakthroughs-in-lung-cancer-from...
http://cancergrace.org/lung/2014/12/21/my-top-five-highlights-in-lung-ca...

As far as median survival statistics, they have not necessarily changed greatly since the patients with very aggressive cancers continue to skew those numbers downward. On the other hand there are more patients who are living longer, and the hope is that we can move more patients to the better side of the median.

JimC
Forum moderator

<p>I began visiting GRACE in July, 2008 when my wife Liz was diagnosed with lung cancer, and became a forum moderator in January, 2010. My beloved wife of 30 years passed away Nov. 4, 2011 after battling stage IV lung cancer for 3 years and 4 months</p>

magazine2
I understand but I was always

I understand but I was always under the impression that the bac part should kind of be wait and watch and not to overtreat. I have had this since 2008, had surgery, then and since then 3 radiations. My doctors said I should not have chemo as it would get me very sick and I test neg for everything. I have the non moucus type. I did smoke, but quit 33 years ago. I just thought there might be some new way of thinking for the type of cancer I have. Thank you very much for your reply. diane

catdander
The goal of treatment is to

The goal of treatment is to lengthen life and enhance quality of life. Whether the nsclc is indolent or aggressive there is most often a point at which systemic treatment has the best chance of fulfilling those goals. The following link includes a discussion of indolent BAC and a very useful visual aid of a flow chart to help look at how doctors make decisions about treatment. http://cancergrace.org/lung/2013/01/20/mf-bac-algorithm/

All best,
Janine

brillianthealing
I am a little confused. On

I am a little confused. On September 06,2014 I underwent a lobectomy for adnocarcinoma (mass) right lower lobe. A week later a underwent another surgery for ligation of a lymph artery that was severed during the initial surgery Dr. Jeffery Hagen at Keck USC performed the surgeries and went bacj for my first ct scan 3 months later there werre nodules (the largest less than 6mm) in the remaining central lobe of the same lung. Dr. Hagen said not to worry that he had seen this a common reaction to surgery and indicated that it is often trauma or could be an infection. Three weeks ago went back for 6 month follw up now more nodules in the right lung. Needle biopsy rsults adnocarcinoma and during the biopsy nodules detected in other lung which were not there 3 weeks ago.Results of genetic ebaluation of the malignant lobe indicated less than 15% chance of recurrence.
Waiting for Oncologist to see me at Keck. What are the most advanced treatments for this cancer now? Is Proton Treatment viable for this?
Is Genetic Evaluation at this point relevant to treatment. What are the mortality staistic?

Thank You
HW

catdander
Hi brillianthealing,

Hi brillianthealing,

I'm so sorry about your surgery was not the cure you and your team had hoped. Everything you wrote sounds unfortunately very reasonable. NSCLC is an awful disease. Our oncologists are working with a cancer that can and will do anything and there are no guarantees. There's one exception about which you wrote, the genetic eval that suggests recurrence rates is not a standard use of genetic testing. Mortality rates differ depending on how aggressive the cancer is and how well the cancer responds to treatments. Mortality rates can be 4 plus years. While some nsclc doesn't respond to chemo well they might respond to genetic mutation targeted therapy very well. The same seems to be true of some people taking immunotherapies but they are still under investigation so you would need to be in a clinical trial to receive it. There are more and better options today than even 2 years ago.

Unfortunately once the cancer moves from the original lung it's no longer considered curable. However treatment for longevity and quality of life is a reasonable goal. To understand better what happened it would be helpful to read one of our posts on understanding lung cancer, such as, http://cancergrace.org/lung/2010/04/05/an-introduction-to-lung-cancer/ . Better yet if you are up to it PBS public broadcasting system is starting a 3 part series tonight, produced by Ken Burns and based on a brilliant book on cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee. More here, http://cancergrace.org/general/2015/03/29/ken-burns-cancer-documentary/

Genetic testing is very important. For those with an adenocarcinoma and an EGFR, ALK, or ROS1 mutation there are very helpful targeted therapies all proven to be the best standard of care for 1st line recurrent adeno nsclc for those with one of the targeted mutations.

I hope you do well on each treatment you try and have a good life ahead.

Janine